Correct D&D grammar

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by tommykai0210, Jul 13, 2018.

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  1. tommykai0210

    tommykai0210 Member

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    Is the correct way of writing (and saying it) "Elven", "Elvish", "Elfin" or "Elfish"? Or something completely fifth? or sixth? Elvis? El Fin? Cocky Gringos?.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2018
  2. sigofmugmort

    sigofmugmort Established Member Supporter

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    "Elvish" referring to things Elven such as language, art, architecture and the like, "Elven" when vice-versa or in other words the two are basically interchangeable. "Elfin" and "elfish" are a corrupted form of the two
     
  3. Pygmy

    Pygmy Established Member Supporter

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    Could I possibly refer you to "NOTE ON THE TEXT" in The Fellowship of the Ring? Indeed I am surprised you felt able to answer this question without reference to J.R.R.Tolkien - had you done so you would have discovered that "Elvish" and "Elven" were Tolkien's versions of the original "Elfish" and "Elfin"
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2018
  4. erkper

    erkper Bugbear Monk Supporter

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    Well Tolkien is the gold standard so I'm good with that.
     
  5. Allyx

    Allyx Master Crafter Global Moderator Supporter

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    It has been obvious from the very beginnings of D&D that Tolkien's works were a major influence in D&D's creation. There was even a court battle about the theft of Tolkien's intellectual property, The Balor Demon was originally named Balrog, after the Demon Gandalf fought in Moria, resulting in the name change mentioned above.

    In terms of the question in the opening post though, the terms Elvish and Elven date back to 12th and 13th century middle English - predating Tolkien by 800 years. While Elfin and Elfish are a way of describing a person or a face as small and mischievous looking.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2018
  6. Pygmy

    Pygmy Established Member Supporter

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    If elvish, elven and dwarvish were English rather than Saxon words in 1954, could you please explain why Tokien's editors kept trying to replace them? If I managed to re-introduce the common usuage of a word such as "nepotism" in its original meaning into the English language surely I should get the credit?
     
  7. Allyx

    Allyx Master Crafter Global Moderator Supporter

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    Nepotism is a word in English... you could add another definition of Nepotism to the English language, but you can only get the credit for it if someone in your family told you to... and the new definition were to be commonly used.

    As for the Elven debate, the site linked below states:

     
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  8. Shiningted

    Shiningted I want my goat back Global Moderator

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    The issue is D&D, not Tolkein (and yes I've read the forward of LotR) - the terms are Elvish and Elven.

    Surely there is room for Elvis though? A n irregular adverb, perhaps? There's always room for Elvis.
     
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